Fireball on January 6, 2016.

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A fireball flew over the celestial ceiling, and behind the mountainside (unfortunately..). Local time for this observation was about 21.35 on January 6, 2015. Photo details: Canon 650D, Samyang 8 mm fisheye-lens, iso: 1600, 58 sec exposure time.

A fireball flew over the celestial ceiling, and behind the mountainside (unfortunately..). Local time for this observation was about 21.35 on January 6, 2015. Photographed from Ørsta, Norway.
Photo details: Canon 650D, Samyang 8 mm fisheye-lens, iso: 1600, 58 sec exposure time.

A rare Earth-grazing meteor on December 27, 2015

A rare, spectacular, exceptional Earth-grazing meteor passed over Norway on 27. December 2015.

A rare, earth-grazing meteor passed over Norway on 27. December 2015. Exposure time 48 seconds, iso: 1600. Contrast enhanced because the sky was brightly lit by the moon.

The Earth-grazing meteor flies in a north-eastern direction to the horizont.

The meteor flies in a north-eastern direction to the horizon. Contrast enhanced to better show the meteors path.

Visual impression:

I was at the camera when the meteor flew over. I saw a red-orange object appearing very much like a plane. But, it was different (and fascinating). The object had, what looked like, a red contrail/trail behind, and flew considerable faster than a plane. Not among the brightest meteors I have observed. No sound. The observation was documented photographically.

 

Equipment used to document this observation:

Equipment pointing in the direction. Where the rare meteor appeared. Equipment employed was a Canon EOS 650D, Samyang 8 mm fish-eye lens. On a tripod, additionally a Kendrick dew-remover was used to avoid dew/ice on the lens.

Equipment pointed in the direction where the rare meteor appeared. Canon EOS 650D, Samyang 8 mm fish-eye lens. on a tripod, additionally a Kendrick dew-remover was used to avoid dew/ice on the lens.

 Camera with fish-eye lens.

Camera with fish-eye lens.

The meteor was also captured by professional automatic allsky-cameras at the Solar Observatory at Harestua, and a private automatic allsky-camera. According to Norsk Meteornettverk (Norwegian meteor network) this is the first earth-grazing meteor documented in Norway.

More information can be found on Norsk Meteornettverks web-site on the link(s) below:

In English (translated by Google):

Norwegian:

http://norskmeteornettverk.no/wordpress/?p=2372

Spectrum obtained August 21, 2015.

Two cameras were in action. One employing a 8 mm fish-eye lens, the second dslr was equipped with a 15 mm fish-eye lens holding a diffraction grating. As described in the caption below.

A cropped section of the image obtained through the 8 mm fish-eye lens. Exposing the field at the same time as the meteor was captured through the diffraction grating. Unfortunately some dew on the lens. Therefore not top image quality.

A cropped section of the image obtained through the 8 mm fish-eye lens. Exposing the field at the same time as the meteor was captured through the diffraction grating. Unfortunately some dew on the lens. Therefore not top image quality.

 

Spectrum obtained on August 21, 2015. At 01.46 local (daylight savings) time (UTC+2). Photo details: Canon EOS 650D, Sigma 15 mm fish-eye lens, Diffraction Grating Double Axis 13,500 lines/inch Laser Spectrometer. ISO: 3200. Exposure: 50.2 seconds.

Spectrum obtained on August 21, 2015. At 01.46 local (daylight savings) time (UTC+2).
Photo details: Canon EOS 650D, Sigma 15 mm fish-eye lens, Diffraction Grating Double Axis 13,500 lines/inch Laser Spectrometer.
ISO: 3200. Exposure: 50.2 seconds.

A more close up:

A cropped version of the image above.

A cropped version of the image above.

Noctilucent Clouds 4th August, 2015.

The northern sky was electric blue-white in the early hours of August 4, 2015 because of a beautiful display of noctilucent clouds.

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The northern sky was electric blue-white because of a beautiful display of noctilucent clouds.

Beautiful NLC structures over the mountain peaks. Here is a photo of the display taken on August 4, 2015.
Photo details: Canon EOS 650D, Sigma 50 – 500 mm, tripod, remote controller

Venus – Jupiter Conjunction.

Venus is easily seen with the naked eye against a bright nordic night sky. Jupiter, however, required a binocular. Enclosed is a photo of the duo taken on July 1st, 2015. At about 23.27 local time.

Venus is easily seen with the naked eye against a bright nordic night sky. Jupiter, however, required a binocular. Enclosed is a photo of the duo taken on July 1st, 2015. At about 23.27 local time. Taken with a Canon 650D, Sigma 50-500 mm lens.